WikiLeaks Cave Looks Like Bond Villain's Lair (PICTURES)

A man walks inside the Pionen high-security computer storage facility of Swedish Bahnhof, one of the companies to host WikiLeaks servers, Dec. 9, 2010, in Stockholm. AFP/Getty Images

A man walks inside the Pionen high-security computer storage facility of Swedish Bahnhof, one of the companies to host WikiLeaks servers, Dec. 9, 2010, in Stockholm.
AFP/Getty Images

While WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange prepares to fight extradition in a British court, it may not help his defense that newly released photos of the data center storing the document-dumping website's files cast Assange as a James Bond villain.

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Photos of the Pionen high-security computer storage facility in Stockholm showcase a "floating" conference room, designer furniture, decorative waterfalls and engines from old German U-boats that serve as backup generators, all housed in an old Cold War nuclear bunker, according to an account in London's Daily Mail.

(Scroll down to view more pictures)

The underground facility stores the secret State Department cables causing headaches for U.S. diplomats around the world as well as the Afghanistan and Iraq war logs WikiLeaks distributed earlier this year, the Daily Mail reported.

Other companies also use the dozens of computer servers at Pionen, which opened in the cave location after a remodel by a Swedish architect who was inspired by Sir Kenneth Adams' sets in Bond films, the Daily Mail reported.

The Swedish cave has proved to be a safe location for the U.S. diplomatic cables Assange obtained. U.S.-based Amazon.com booted WikiLeaks from its servers after being pressured by the Obama administration. A French firm later followed suit.

Swedish law protects WikiLeaks and its sources from prosecution, the Daily Mail reported.

A man walks inside the Pionen high-security computer storage facility of Swedish Bahnhof, one of the companies to host WikiLeaks servers, Dec. 9, 2010, in Stockholm.
AFP/Getty Images
A man works on his laptop in the Pionen high-security computer storage facility of Swedish Bahnhof, one of the companies to host WikiLeaks servers, Dec. 9, 2010, in Stockholm.
AFP/Getty Images
A woman walks her dog past the entrance to the Pionen high-security computer storage facility of Swedish Bahnhof, one of the companies to host WikiLeaks servers, Dec. 9, 2010, in Stockholm.
AFP/Getty Images

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  • Alex Sundby

    Alex Sundby is an associate news editor for CBSNews.com

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