Supreme Court To Take NFL Apparel Case

Toni Collette attends a party after the New York premiere of "Little Miss Sunshine" on July 25, 2006. On the subject of family road trips, she told The Associated Press: "You know, what scares me is these cars that come out with DVD players. Because if families go away, part of the joy is sitting there and experiencing moving through the land. And now, it's so easy for people not to be where they are." GETTY IMAGES/Evan Agostini

The Supreme Court agreed Monday to decide whether the National Football League and its 32 teams can enter an exclusive licensing deal with a maker of team jerseys and other gear without violating federal antitrust law.

The court said it will hear an appeal from American Needle Inc., of Buffalo Grove, Ill., that challenges an agreement the NFL struck with Reebok International Ltd. American Needle had been one of many firms that manufactured NFL headwear until the league granted an exclusive contract to Reebok in 2001.

The NFL won the case in the federal appeals court in Chicago. But it also asked the Supreme Court to hear the case in a quest for a more sweeping decision that could put an end to what the league considers costly, frivolous antitrust lawsuits.

The case concerns whether the league is essentially a "single entity" that can act collectively or 32 distinct businesses that must be careful about running afoul of antitrust laws by working too closely together.

Other than Major League Baseball, which has an antitrust exemption dating to 1922, the other sports leagues have an intense interest in the case. The National Basketball Association and the National Hockey League both asked the court to rule in favor of the NFL.

Reebok was acquired by Adidas AG in 2006 in a $3.8 billion deal that helped the German company expand in the United States.

The case will be argued late this year or early in 2010.

The case is American Needle v. National Football League, 08-661.

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