Romney's new ads: one positive, one negative

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks during a campaign event at Van Dyck Park Sept. 13, 2012, in Fairfax, Va. AP Photo

Updated 10:42 p.m. ET

(CBS News) Mitt Romney's campaign is out with two new ads Monday, one hammering President Obama on the economy and the other is a rare positive ad.

"The Romney Plan" does not mention his rival nor does it criticize Mr. Obama's policies. Instead, it features Romney talking optimistically about his plan "to help the middle class" with upbeat music and images of American workers.

The ad is meant to introduce parts of his five-point plan to revive the economy. Romney speaks to the camera saying, "Trade has to work for America. That means crack down on cheaters like China. It means open up new markets."

The other priorities he mentions are reducing the deficit and promoting small businesses. "Have tax policies, regulations, and healthcare policies that help small business," Romney said.

"We put those in place, we'll add 12 million new jobs in four years," the Republican presidential candidate concludes.

The second ad, "Failing American Families," is a more typical campaign ad that uses a brooding narrator and music and criticizes Mr. Obama for falling median household income and a rising deficit.

"Under Obama, families have lost over $4,000 a year in income," the narrator says, referring to an independent study that showed median household income dropped $4,019 between January 2009 and June 2012, from $54,983 to $50,964. What the ad doesn't mention is the broader context that Mr. Obama inherited a recession when he took office in January 2009, a recession began under former President George W. Bush. Even if Mr. Obama is cut some slack for the first six months of his term, the study revealed income still fell over $2,500 from June 2009 through June 2012, a 5 percent drop.

"More spending, more debt... Failing American families," the ad concludes.

  • Leigh Ann Caldwell On Twitter»

    Leigh Ann Caldwell is a political reporter for CBSNews.com.

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