Poll: Youth In Sync With Adults

GENERIC President Bush, Presidential Seal, over a U.S. Flag. AP / CBS

On behalf of MTV, CBS News conducted a poll among more than 600 14- to 24-year-olds by telephone from November 11 to 15, 2005. These respondents were part of nationwide representative samples identified in households previously interviewed by CBS News Polls and from RDD samples.



Tap into the minds of young Americans, and you'll find many of the same concerns shared by their elders, from the war in Iraq to the economy at home. Just half of the 14- to 24-year-olds polled think the government was right in launching the war in Iraq, and most youth agree with adults in thinking it is going badly.

A majority of those polled:

  • Are troubled by the war in Iraq

  • Express concern about the direction of the country

  • Disapprove of the president's handling of the economy

  • Feel disconnected from the government generally

  • Don't think another terrorist attack is very likely soon


    The War, The President

    The war in Iraq has achieved greater prominence in the minds of young people over the past six months.

  • Just half of 14- to 24-year-olds now think it was the right thing to do, and a majority thinks it is going badly.

  • Younger people express more optimism than all Americans about staying the course in Iraq, but are similar to all adults in their views on whether the war has made the U.S. safer or not.

  • Still, views of President George W. Bush are as negative among this age group as they are among adults as a whole.


    Education

    Not surprisingly given their stage in life, personal concerns of young people center on education and jobs.

  • Most think their schools do a good job preparing students for college, but fewer say the same about how well their schools prepare them for jobs after high school.

  • Interest in using the internet as a means of improving job skills is widespread among those in this age group.

    Education is young people's greatest personal concern.

    When asked to choose their own most important issue from a list, education tops the list; followed by the issues of the economy and jobs as well as the combined issues of terrorism, national security and the war in Iraq .

  • Selected most often is education, 35 percent choose it.

  • The economy and jobs is picked by 14 percent.

  • Terrorism, national security or the war in Iraq are selected by 13 percent.

    Education: room for improvement, especially on job preparedness and using the internet as a means.

    While many young adults believe their high school prepares students for college or jobs, they still see room for improvement, especially on job preparedness. Interest in using the internet as a means of improving job skills is widespread among those in this age group.

  • More than two thirds of 14- to 24-year-olds thinks their high school properly prepares people for college, but fewer — 49 percent — think their school does a good job preparing people who don't go to college for jobs after high school.

  • Those under age 18 — most of whom are still in high school and have limited experience with the job market — are significantly more likely than those aged 18 to 24 to say their high school does a good job preparing people for college or the job market.

  • But even among this younger group, more say their high school does a good job preparing students for college than it does for jobs.


    • Bootie Cosgrove-Mather

    Comments

    CBSN Live

    pop-out
    Live Video

    Watch CBSN Live

    Watch CBS News anytime, anywhere with the new 24/7 digital news network. Stream CBSN live or on demand for FREE on your TV, computer, tablet, or smartphone.