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O.J. Simpson Asks Nevada Supreme Court Panel to Reconsider His Appeal

O.J. Simpson was a giant on and off the field. He was the first NFL player to run for 2000 yards in a single season and scored parts in Hollywood films and television endorsement deals - a relative rarity for a black athlete in the 1970s. But O.J. is now most famous for his alleged role in the 1994 murder of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman.
file,AP Photo
O.J. Simpson Asks Nevada Supreme Court Panel to Reconsider
O.J. Simpson (AP Photo)

LAS VEGAS (CBS/AP) O.J. Simpson's legal team is asking a Nevada Supreme Court panel to reconsider whether the football Hall of Famer should get a new trial following his Las Vegas armed robbery and kidnapping conviction.

Simpson's attorney Yale Galanter filed a request for a rehearing Tuesday, asserting that the justices overlooked or misunderstood several key arguments in Simpson's appeal.

In the request, Galanter argued that his client lacked the necessary intent to commit a crime, that the last two black jurors were dismissed without proper cause, and that jurors weren't completely screened for bias.

Galanter suggested the general public already "views the former football great as a criminal" after his arrest and acquittal in the 1994 murder of his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson.

"This court fully understands Simpson's name is shorthand for murder," Galanter wrote.

In the past, Galanter has argued that Simpson thought he was retrieving personal items when he, and five other men confronted two sports memorabilia dealers and a middleman at gunpoint in a Las Vegas casino hotel room in September 2007.

Simpson, 63, is currently serving nine to 33 years in Nevada state prison.

"This was not a search for truth, but became a search for redemption," Galanter said.

"I am sure O.J. Simpson will be like every other convicted criminal," Clark County District Attorney David Roger said, "and will file numerous repetitious, frivolous appeals."