O'Donnell: Akin's comment cost him $10 million

Rep. Todd Akin, R-Mo., talks with reporters while attending the Governor's Ham Breakfast at the Missouri State Fair in Sedalia, Mo., Aug. 16, 2012. AP Photo

(CBS News) On "CBS This Morning," chief White House correspondent Norah O'Donnell and John Dickerson discussed Rep. Todd Akin's, R-Mo., refusal to end his bid for the Senate, despite mounting pressure by leaders of his own party to do so.

"Everybody has said stop, go be done with this, and he's not moving so far. His option would be to continue on and continue on against his party and threaten the chance his party has to take over the Senate. He is a pariah and he would be an all-star pariah if he stayed on beyond this deadline Missouri has for him to withdraw his name, [but] he's resisting. There have been plenty of people are opening exit doors for him," Dickerson said.

Akin can withdraw without cost or without obtaining additional court-issued paperwork before 5:00 p.m. Tuesday.

Akin apologizes, resists calls to step aside

O'Donnell said Akin's comments about a woman not able to get pregnant from "forcible rape" has cost the Missouri lawmakers millions should he stay in the race.

"Top republicans have called him and said you're done. We're not going to give you $5 million from the Senate committee. Crossroads, an independent super PAC, has said that they are not going to give him $5 million. This has already cost him $10 million. I have heard republican say he does not have enough money in his account o win. That's why he put out that fundraising appeal.

"As far as the Democrats, you heard the president come before the press corps after avoiding the press corps for eight weeks, to slam the statement and also to try and tie the comments to the Republican Party platform and to a bill Akin has co-sponsored with [vice presidential candidate] Paul Ryan to try and make this larger point about the Republican Party and women's rights. So, you see the Democrats saying at this point, he, we hope Akin stays in because Claire McCaskill was the most endangered democrat in the United States Senate now has a hope of victory."

Comments