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Monsignor William Lynn denied house arrest, jailed until sentencing for child endangerment

Monsignor William Lynn walks to the Criminal Justice Center before a scheduled verdict reading, Friday, June 22, 2012, in Philadelphia. Lynn was convicted Friday of child endangerment but acquitted of conspiracy in a groundbreaking clergy-abuse trial, becoming the first U.S. church official convicted of a crime for mishandling abuse claims. The jury could not agree on a verdict for Lynn's co-defendant, the Rev. James Brennan, who was accused of sexually abusing a 14-year-old boy. AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Monsignor William Lynn walks to the Criminal Justice Center before a scheduled verdict reading, Friday, June 22, 2012, in Philadelphia.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

(CBS/AP) PHILADELPHIA - William Lynn, the Philadelphia monsignor convicted of child endangerment for reassigning a priest suspected of abuse to a new parish, has been denied house arrest.

Judge M. Teresa Sarmina ruled Thursday after prosecutors argued Lynn should be treated like any other felon and remain jailed until his sentencing hearing.

Lynn's attorneys say their client isn't a flight risk and argued for his release on house arrest. But prosecutors say other defendants in Lynn's situation wouldn't be accommodated the same way.

"We're of course disappointed in the Judge's decision to deny bail pending sentence, but this decision was not unexpected," Lynn's attorney, Jeff Lindy, told CBS News. "Despite all of this, Msgr. Lynn's somehow has been able to remain in good spirits. He's a person of strong faith, and that has really helped him through all of this so far."

Judge Sarmina did approve a defense request to move sentencing up from Aug. 13 to July 24. Lynn faces 3 1/2 to seven years in prison.

Lynn was the first U.S. church official ever convicted for his handling of abuse complaints. His attorneys plan to appeal.

Complete coverage of Monsignor William Lynn on Crimesider

  • Casey Glynn

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