Kate Middleton's coat of arms unveiled

The new coat of arms for Catherine Middleton's family is displayed at the College of Arms in London on April 18, 2011, in London. Suzanne Plunkett - WPA Pool / Getty Images

The new coat of arms for Catherine Middleton's family is displayed at the College of Arms in London on April 18, 2011, in London.
Getty

(CBS/AP) Kate Middleton has a new coat to show off - but it's not a stylish trench or a warm peacoat.

It's the princess-to-be's new coat of arms, which was unveiled Tuesday.

Pictures: Kate Middleton
Special section: The royal wedding

The coat of arms displays three acorn sprigs that represent the three Middleton children - Kate, Pippa and James - and reflects the many oak trees in the English countryside village of Bucklebury where they live, according to a statement.

Blue and red were chosen for the design, as they are the main colors in the flag of the United Kingdom.

The coat of arms also includes a gold chevron, which represents Middleton's mother, Carole (her maiden name is Goldsmith). White chevrons on each side represent hills and mountains, a reference to the outdoor activities the family enjoys. It hangs from a blue ribbon, which indicates an unmarried daughter.

Thomas Woodcock, garter king of arms at the College of Arms, said, "Mr. and Mrs. Middleton and their children took enormous interest in this design and, while its purpose is to provide a traditional heraldic identity for Catherine, as she marries into the Royal Family, the intent was to represent the whole Middleton family together, their home and aspects of what they enjoy."

He added, "Every Coat of Arms has been designed to identify a person, school or organization, and to last forever: heraldry is Europe's oldest, most visual and strictly regulated form of identity and it surrounds us in Britain, giving clues to our history and surroundings."

After the royal wedding, Middleton will place her family's coat of arms next to those of Prince William in what is known as "an impaled Coat of Arms."

This will require a royal warrant from the queen, Woodcock  said.

Comments