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Fred Goldman: Justice Not Served

The verdict cut like a knife for Fred Goldman.

"We, the jury in the above entitled action, find the defendant, Orenthal James Simpson, not guilty of the crime of murder upon Ronald Lyle Goldman."

"It felt like someone had taken a 2-by-4 and hit me smack across the head," Goldman tells The Early Show's co-anchor Harry Smith. "It hasn't happened to me in awhile, but, some years ago, I saw someone in a car and I literally chased that car on the freeway. I had to get next to it. There was a piece of me that said, 'Oh my God, that's Ron.'"

The arrival of first-born Samuel Ronald has brought Kim Goldman Hahn, Ron Goldman's sister, and her father a measure of joy. But their resolute belief that justice was not served and their rage lie just beneath the surface.

"[Ron Goldman] had a dream, and he was ready to make it happen," says Fred Goldman. "And then [he] murdered him."

The Goldmans never refer to O.J. Simpson by name.

Fred Goldman says, "I could never, ever have imagined that, after the volumes of evidence and nine months of trial … that when all was said and done, any jury could possibly have ever come to any verdict other than guilty. Needless to say, I was wrong."

Kim Goldman Hahn says she is angry Simpson receives publicity.

"It seems like every couple of months he pops up again," says Goldman Hahn. "You know, when his ego needs a little boosting or something."

For the Goldmans, Simpson's freedom is a painful reminder of the success of his "Dream Team" – some of the best attorneys in the United States who were gathered to represent Simpson.

"I think that the defense did a, unfortunately, a really great job of clouding every possible scenario, like they're supposed to do," says Kim Goldman Hahn. "They threw as much up against the wall as they could. And it seems like everything stuck."

The prosecution wasn't as successful.

Fred Goldman still questions the prosecution's strategy to have Simpson wear gloves -- evidence of the case – that did not fit.

"What were they protecting by having him wear latex gloves to try on a glove, a leather glove, that was brittle at that point, stiff from having been soaked in blood," questions Goldman. "It was all antics."

But the Goldmans reserve their harshest criticism for Judge Lance Ito.

"[Ito] allowed Cochran to take control of that courtroom," says Fred Goldman of Ito's performance as judge of the Simpson case. "He allowed all of the baloney to be given to the jury. Allowed racism. He allowed planting of evidence. With never a shred of evidence that any of those things had any place in the trial … He allowed the courtroom to be turned into a circus, and the ringmaster wasn't him."

Simpson was later found responsible for the killings of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman in a civil trial. He was ordered to pay millions to the Goldmans.

But, the Goldmans say they have never received a penny from Simpson.

"[Simpson] made it clear that he has no intention of ever honoring the judgment," says Kim Goldman Hahn. "He says he'll never work again if that means he has to. That he won't have to pay us."

The Goldmans say they would have preferred to have seen Simpson convicted and sentenced to death.

"Having him gone with a needle in his arm would have been just fine for me," says Fred Goldman. "I would have been more than glad to see him die."

It's still hardest of all for the Goldmans to speak about Ron Goldman.

"My nightmare was Ron putting up a fight," says Fred Goldman. "And then, ultimately, just laying there and dying."

In remembrance, Kim Goldman Hahn wears her brother's necklace -- an Egyptian symbol of eternal life.

"My poor husband can never buy me jewelry because I won't ever take it off," says Kim Goldman Hahn.

Fred Goldman wears his son's bracelet, but it can never begin to replace vivid memories of a happier time when Ron and Kim were children.

Fred Goldman notes, "I took a picture of them from the back, and they were holding hands walking down the path. I kept thinking of that as we talked -- two of them walking together. And as I think about it, I don't have the pleasure, the joy, the opportunity to see them hand in hand again."