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Dr. Conrad Murray considers testifying about Michael Jackson's death

Dr. Conrad Murray looks on during his involuntary manslaughter trial on Oct. 12, 2011 in Los Angeles, Calif. Murray has plead not guilty and faces four years in prison and the loss of his medical license if convicted of involuntary manslaughter in Michael Jackson's death. Pool,AP Photo/Robyn Beck

Dr. Conrad Murray considers testifying about Michael Jackson's death
Dr. Conrad Murray
AP Photo/Robyn Beck

(CBS/AP) LOS ANGELES - Dr. Conrad Murray, the physician charged in Michael Jackson's death, says he is still undecided about whether he will take the stand.

Pictures: Who's who in the trial of Dr. Conrad Murray
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Video: Dr. Conrad Murray manslaughter trial begins

"At this time, I have not made a final decision," Murray said after testimony concluded Monday. When Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor asked Murray when he would decide, the cardiologist said in a soft voice, "It depends on how the case progresses, sir."

Murray has pleaded not guilty to involuntary manslaughter and faces up to four years behind bars and the loss of his medical license if convicted.

Murray's statements came after the prosecution's intense grilling of Dr. Paul White, an anesthesia expert who said he believes Jackson injected himself with the fatal dose of propofol when Murray left his bedside on June 25, 2009.

After asking only eight questions Monday morning, Deputy District Attorney David Walgren got  White to acknowledge that Murray had repeatedly violated the physician's standard of care.

Throughout the day, White also told jurors that he would never have done what Murray was doing - giving Jackson propofol as a sleep aid.

"I wouldn't even consider it," White said. "It's something no amount of money could convince me to take on."

Complete coverage of the Conrad Murray - Michael Jackson case on CBS News

  • Edecio Martinez

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