Biden: "No silver bullet" to prevent gun violence

U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden speaks during a meeting with representatives from the video game and entertainment industries January 11, 2013 at the Eisenhower Executive Office Building of the White House in Washington, DC. Alex Wong/Getty Images

"We know that there is no silver bullet, no seat belt you can put on" to prevent gun violence, Biden said with representatives from the Entertainment Software Association, which represents publishers of video games, including Microsoft and Disney, and video game developers sitting at the same table. Also in attendance were leaders of a government-funded study on the effects of violent video games on teens.

Indicating that video game creators are not to blame for an increase of violence, Biden told the group that they have "not been singled out," but that he is asking for advice from a lot of different groups of people on how to decrease gun violence.

Today's meeting comes a day after the president of the National Rifle Association said publicly he was "disappointed" with how his group's meeting with Biden went.

"We were disappointed in a sense, because prior to the meeting, they made a number of statements from the White House that they haven't made up their mind," NRA president David Keene told CBS News. "But at the meeting, the vice president made it clear that in terms of firearms, they have made up their mind."

Biden declined to comment extensively on the NRA meeting, but today said it was "straightforward" and "productive."

Thursday, Biden outlined a series of recommendations he plans to give President Obama by Tuesday, including universal background checks, restrictions on high-capacity magazines, and increased federal capabilities for effectively researching gun violence. Biden also stressed ongoing discussions about the importance of including the mental health community in the conversation.

"There's an emerging set of recommendations, not coming from me, but coming from the groups we've met with, and I'm gonna focus on the ones that relate primarily to gun ownership, what types of weapons can be owned," Biden said Thursday.

The Brady Campaign, which is working for enhanced gun regulations, released the policy proposals they gave to Biden. It includes closing the gun show loophole, which allows the sale of guns without background checks, and banning assault weapons and high capacity magazines - all proposals the president has previously said he supports.

In addition to the Brady Campaign, Biden met with victims of gun violence, gun sports groups, entertainment industry officials, retailers of guns and pro-gun groups, including the NRA.

Biden was tapped by the president to lead the task force just days after a mass shooting in Newtown, Conn., killed 20 children and 7 adults. Biden also said gun violence is a bigger issue than mass shootings. "We have a problem beyond the massacres... there's 10,000 people a year gunned down in our cities.... It's a real problem. It's serious," he said.

As senator, Biden authored a massive crime bill in 1994 that included an assault weapons ban. That ban expired in 2004 and has been stalled in Congress since.

  • Leigh Ann Caldwell On Twitter»

    Leigh Ann Caldwell is a political reporter for CBSNews.com.

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