Anthony Weiner vows to fight on despite pressure

U.S. Congressman Anthony Weiner, D-NY, is pursued by the media as he leaves a news conference in New York, June 6, 2011. AP Photo/Richard Drew

Rep. Anthony Weiner is vowing to fight on.

Confronted on the streets of New York City Thursday by a reporter for the New York Post and asked if he planned to resign, the New York Democrat simply said, "I'm not."

"I betrayed a lot of people and I know it. I'm trying to get back to work now and try to make amends to my constituents and of course to my family," Weiner told the newspaper.

Like Weiner, many House Democrats are back in their districts during a congressional break this week.

And that means he can avoid them.

But lawmakers are back to work next week and Weiner will be forced to face angry lawmakers -- and a lot more reporters, who will ask him at every turn if he plans to quit.

U.S. Congressman Anthony Weiner, D-NY, is pursued by the media as he leaves a news conference in New York, June 6, 2011.
U.S. Congressman Anthony Weiner, D-NY, is pursued by the media as he leaves a news conference in New York, June 6, 2011.
AP Photo/Richard Drew
House Democrats began to step up pressure on the New York congressman to resign Wednesday, and there is no sign of that letting up.

As of mid-afternoon Thursday, nine House Democrats and two Democratic senators have called for Weiner to pack his bags.

"I don't think anyone wants an ethics investigation. They just want him to resign," an aide to a New York congressional Democrat told CBS News.

A Democratic lawmaker who has spoken with Weiner told CBS' Jill Jackson on condition of anonymity Thursday that he does no think it is in Weiner's DNA to quit.

House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi called for the House ethics committee to look into whether Weiner broke any House rules CUT within minutes of Weiner's admission that he cavorted over the phone and through social media with a half-dozen women he says he never met.

And that was before an X-rated photo believed to be of Weiner showed up on the Internet -- and the New York Times reported that his wife is pregnant.

It is unclear what impact news of his wife's pregnancy will have on the way his colleagues treat him.

Perhaps they will be more willing to cut him some slack as he sorts out his personal life, or they could use it as a talking point to tell him he needs to focus on his family and stop worrying about his career. The latter would allow House members to move on from a topic none wants to discuss.

Stay tuned.

  • Corbett Daly On Twitter»

    CBSNews.com Deputy Politics Editor Corbett B. Daly is based in Washington. He has worked at Reuters, Thomson Financial News and CBS MarketWatch.

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