World Series Poll: 45% Don't Care

The 2003 World Series: New York Yankees and Florida Marlins logos and World Series logo. AP / CBS

This year's World Series divides the country: as many Americans want the Yankees to capture the World Series title as want to see the Marlins win. However, 45 percent say they don't care either way.

The New York Yankees are vying for another World Series win after losing to the Arizona Diamondbacks in their last appearance in 2001.

The Florida Marlins have made it back to the playoffs this year for the first time since winning the Series in 1997.

WHO DO YOU WANT TO WIN THE WORLD SERIES?

Yankees
All
27%
Northeast
43%
South
22%

Marlins
All
27%
Northeast
19%
South
29%

Don't care
All
45%
Northeast
38%
South
48%

Northeasterners are rooting for the Yankees by 43 percent to 19 percent, and Southerners are supporting the Marlins by 29 percent to 22 percent. However, sizeable numbers of people in each team's home region say it doesn't matter who wins.

Nationwide, women tend to support the Yankees over the Marlins (30 percent to 23 percent), while men back the Marlins, 31 percent to 25 percent. Americans under age 45 are leaning towards the Yankees (33 percent to 25 percent), while those over age 45 are slightly more likely to favor the Marlins (30 percent to 21 percent).

More Americans have a rooting interest in this World Series then they did in 2000, when the "Subway Series" pitted two New York teams -- the Yankees and Mets -- against each other; then, 58 percent of Americans said they didn't care which team won. In the 2001 Series between the Yankees and Arizona Diamondbacks, which took place shortly after the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, Americans pulled for the New York team by 33 percent to 24 percent.

WHO DO YOU WANT TO WIN THE WORLD SERIES?

2001
Yankees
33%
Diamondbacks
24%
Don't care
42%

2000
Yankees
20%
Mets
20%
Don't Care
58%




This poll was conducted among a nationwide random sample of 751 adults interviewed by telephone October 20-21, 2003. The error due to sampling could be plus or minus four percentage points for results based on the entire sample.

For detailed information on how CBS News conducts public opinion surveys, click here.

  • Bootie Cosgrove-Mather

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