Surge In Iraq Violence A Bad Sign

A man fixes electrical wires next to a destroyed police patrol car in Zafraniyah in southeastern Baghdad, Iraq, Feb. 28, 2009. AP Photo/Mahmoud Badri

The reminders are none too subtle.

As the United States was announcing troop draw downs in Iraq, the now mostly quiet country has erupted again in violence.

Starting last week at a livestock market where at least 13 were killed by a suicide bomber.

A day or so later a female suicide bomber killed several dozen women and children while they ate and rested on a religious pilgrimage.

On Sunday, another suicide bomber attacked a group of police recruits killing dozens more and on Tuesday comes news from Baghdad that a suicide bomber killed several dozen people Shiites and Sunnis together for a reconciliation session.

Increasingly Americans have handed over the lead on patrols and military action to the Iraqis.

Hundreds of thousands of soldiers and security forces have been trained and seemed poised to take over. But, the poison that split Iraq into a civil war is still present.

And to some degree it will remain if the U.S. is there or not.
By Harry Smith
  • Harry Smith

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