Scientists encode text messages in evaporated alcohol

YouTube/YorkUniversity

A team of scientists recently discovered a way to send encoded text messages through evaporated vodka.

The study – a collaborative effort between researchers at both York University and the University of Warwick – found that messages converted to binary signals could be transmitted through evaporated particles, Phys.org learned.

For their first transmission, scientists transmitted the lyrics to the Canadian national anthem across a distance of several meters using a common desk fan.

“We believe we have sent the world’s first text message to be transmitted entirely with molecular communication, controlling concentration levels of the alcohol molecules, to encode the alphabets with single spray representing bit 1 and no spray representing the bit 0,” lead researcher Nariman Farsad, a doctoral candidate at York University, was quoted as saying.

“Imagine sending a detailed message using perfume – it sounds like something from a spy thriller novel, but in reality it is an incredibly simple way to communicate,” Dr. Weisi Guo, a researcher based at the University of Warwick’s School of Engineering, additionally noted.

Traditionally, text messages and alcohol are not considered a wise combination, due in large part to the effects of alcohol on the body. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, alcohol acts as a central nervous system depressant whose effects could impair judgement.

CDC researchers noted that, beyond those short-term complications, excessive alcohol use or abuse could come with severe consequences, including “harm to one’s health, interpersonal relationships, or ability to work.”

The study was published in the journal PLOS ONE. Watch the researchers discuss the details below.

This article was originally published by CBS Atlanta

 

 

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