Schwarzenegger Knocks Palin on Climate

(CBS/AP)
California Republican Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger told the Financial Times that the United States should try to be the "power" behind the effort to fight climate change – and in the process took a shot at former Alaska governor Sarah Palin, who has expressed skepticism over global warming science.

"America within 10 years could get 20 per cent of its power needs from renewables," Schwarzenegger said. "We have sun, wind - you can even now get oil from algae. There is a green revolution [in California] but the whole US could be leading like that."

As for Palin's comments on climate change – she wrote in a Washington Post op-ed suggesting that Americans should be skeptical of the overwhelming scientific consensus that global warming is real and man-made – the California governor had this to say: "You have to ask: what was she trying to accomplish? Is she really interested in this subject or is she interested in her career and in winning the [Republican presidential] nomination?"

Arnold: Environment, Economy Can Coexist

In other climate change news, dozens of major corporations -- among them Microsoft, Dow and Nike – have signed onto a letter urging President Obama to lead the way toward working out an international agreement to address climate change in Copenhagen.

"The costs of inaction far outweigh the costs of action," the letter, which Glenn Thrush has posted here, states. "Our environment and economy are at stake."

The companies go on to argue that the president's "forceful leadership is essential" to crafting an international agreement to address global warming.

UPDATE: CLICK HERE TO READ PALIN'S RESPONSE

More:

Poll Finds Support for Addressing Global Warming
UN: "Stop Pointing Fingers" on Climate
US-China Showdown Still Looms Over Climate Talks

Comments

CBSN Live

pop-out
Live Video

Watch CBSN Live

Watch CBS News anytime, anywhere with the new 24/7 digital news network. Stream CBSN live or on demand for FREE on your TV, computer, tablet, or smartphone.