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Russians scoff at intel report on U.S. election hacking

MOSCOW - A report by U.S. security services blaming Russia for meddling in the U.S. presidential race in an effort to support Donald Trump’s election has brought stinging rejoinders from Russian politicians and news media, and a warning to “fools” from the president-elect himself.

Russian President Vladimir Putin -- who was directly accused in the report of having personally ordered the election interference -- has largely stayed silent on the issue, attending Orthodox Christmas services in Moscow as usual over the weekend. Instead, his supporters in Moscow have taken to lashing out at the U.S. intelligence community’s conclusions, with many focusing on the report’s lack of concrete evidence.

2017-01-06t222514z-83566221-rc1dee564060-rtrmadp-3-christmas-season-russia.jpg

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a service on Orthodox Christmas at the St. George monastery, also called Yuriev monastery, outside Novgorod, Russia January 7, 2017.

Sputnik/Mikhail Klimentyev/Kremlin

Alexei Pushkov, a member of the upper house of parliament’s defense and security committee, said on Twitter that “all the accusations against Russia are based on ‘confidence’ and suppositions. The USA in the same way was confident about (Iraqi leader Saddam) Hussein having weapons of mass destruction.”

In another tweet on Saturday, Pushkov suggested that President “Obama is alarmed: Republicans trust Putin more than Democrats.”

Margarita Simonyan, the editor of government-funded satellite TV channel RT that is frequently mentioned in the U.S. report, said in a blog post: “Dear CIA: what you have written here is a complete fail.”

The report hasn’t changed President-elect Donald Trump’s call for warmer relations with Moscow.

Trump declared in a series of tweets on Saturday that “only ‘stupid’ people or fools” would come to a different conclusion.

“Having a good relationship with Russia is a good thing, not a bad thing,” he stated from Trump Tower, adding: “We have enough problems without yet another one.”

American intelligence officials on Friday briefed the president-elect on their conclusions that the Kremlin interfered in the 2016 election in order to help him win the White House. An unclassified version of the report explicitly tied Russian President Vladimir Putin to election meddling and said that Moscow had a “clear preference” for Trump in his race against Hillary Clinton.

Trump has repeatedly sought to downplay the allegations, alarming some who see a pattern of skepticism directed at U.S. intelligence agencies and a willingness to embrace Putin.

There has been no official comment from Moscow on the report, which was released as Russia observed Orthodox Christmas.

During the election, Trump praised the Russian strongman as a decisive leader, and argued that the two countries would benefit from a better working relationship - though attempts by the Obama administration at a “Russian reset” have proved unsuccessful.

At the same time, intelligence officials believe that Russia isn’t done intruding in U.S. politics and policymaking.

Immediately after the Nov. 8 election, Russia began a “spear-phishing” campaign to try to trick people into revealing their email passwords, targeting U.S. government employees and think tanks that specialize in national security, defense and foreign policy, the unclassified version of the report said.

The report said Russian government provided hacked emails from the Democratic National Committee and Clinton’s campaign chairman, John Podesta, to the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks. The website’s founder, Julian Assange, has denied that it got the emails it released from the Russian government. The report noted that the emails could have been passed through middlemen.

Russia also used state-funded propaganda and paid “trolls” to make nasty comments on social media services, the report said. Moreover, intelligence officials believe that Moscow will apply lessons learned from its activities in the election to put its thumbprint on future elections in the United States and allied nations.

The public report was minus classified details that intelligence officials shared with President Barack Obama on Thursday.

In an interview with The Associated Press after the briefing, Trump said he “learned a lot” from his discussions with intelligence officials, but he declined to say whether he accepted their assertion that Russia had intruded in the election on his behalf.

Trump released a one-page statement that did not address whether Russia sought to meddle. Instead, he said, “there was absolutely no effect on the outcome of the election” and that there “was no tampering whatsoever with voting machines.”

Intelligence officials have never made that claim. And the report stated that the Department of Homeland Security did not think that the systems that were targeted or compromised by Russian actors were “involved in vote tallying.”

Trump has said he will appoint a team within three months of taking office to develop a plan to “aggressively combat and stop cyberattacks.”