Progress against Colorado blaze, but some families left in agony

(CBS News) BLACK FOREST, Colo. - With a break in the weather, the 750 firefighters got their first real chance against a fire that can spread faster than a man can run.

"As the fire moves and it's burning, it's throwing embers out in front of it, up to about a third of a mile. The way it moves, it runs, it jumps, and it joins forces," said Incident Commander Rich Harvey.

But it was slowed, at least for now, thanks to a thunderstorm that swept through the burning area.

It has been a week of agony for Michael and Frances Vialpando who moved to the heart of Black Forest in 1962.

"I built that house with a wheelbarrow and mixer," said Michael Vialpando.

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Their two sons and two daughters eventually built their houses within walking distance of their parents.

The entire family had just 10 minutes to leave when the fire rushed in on Tuesday.

Frances said she didn't manage to take any family photos or mementos with her.

Incident Commander Rich Harvey, center, gives an update on the Black Forest Fire, to residents during a press briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., on June 14, 2013.
Incident Commander Rich Harvey, center, gives an update on the Black Forest Fire, to residents during a press briefing in Colorado Springs, Colo., on June 14, 2013.
AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

"Everything was in the house, we lost everything," said Frances.

Now all that's left of their house is a chimney, and the other houses may also be destroyed.

"The house is important of course but my kids are all living so that's the most important thing. Thank God for their safety," said Frances.

"It's easy to rebuild when you are young. I'm 80 years old. If I had to do it again, I'm not sure I can," said Michael.

The children have created a fund to rebuild their parent's house. It was not insured.

And from this sadness, comes a family's resilience.

"We're going to just pull back together and help each other out," said Michael Jr.