On cusp of election, polls still tight

Monday's third presidential debate will focus exclusively on foreign policy, and could play a critical role in the election's outcome. Rebecca Jarvis and Anthony Mason discussed it with pollster and Republican strategist Frank Luntz.

Updated 5 p.m. ET

The latest round of polling out this weekend has not cleared up what President Obama's or Mitt Romney's prospects are for victory on Election Day.

New George Washington University/Politico and Wall Street Journal/NBC polls show the two tied among national likely voters going into Tuesday: 48 to 48 percent in the GWU/Politico survey, 48 to 47 percent in favor of Mr. Obama in the WSJ/NBC poll.

And if you needed more evidence, a Washington Post/ABC News poll out yesterday showed the two knotted up at 48 percent.

A Pew poll released later Sunday showed the president up three points among likely voters 48 to 45 percent.  Most interestingly, the survey was taken entirely after superstorm Sandy hit and the results show that the Mr. Obama may be benefiting from his handling of the storm.  Sixty-nine percent of all likely voters polled approve of his handling of the storm, 63 percent of swing voters approve and even 46 percent of Romney voters approve of how the president dealt with Sandy.

In the battleground states, it's not much different.

A new University of New Hampshire/WMUR poll has the two tied at 48 percent in the Granite State.

In Ohio, a Columbus Dispatch poll out today shows the president up 2 points over Romney, 50 to 48 percent, within the poll's margin of error.

One battleground state that shows a consistent bit of difference between the two is Iowa. A Des Moines Register poll released Saturday shows Mr. Obama with a five-point lead over Romney, 47 to 42 percent. A poll released Thursday by Marist/Wall Street Journal/NBC shows a similar lead for the president there: 50 to 44 percent.


  • Steve Chaggaris

    Steve Chaggaris is CBSNews.com's Executive Editor, Washington.

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