Israeli group hacks Saudi stock exchange sites

Saudi men chat outside the Saudi Stock Exchange or Tadawul in Riyadh on Dec. 5, 2009. Saudi stocks closed down one percent as investors shrugged off neighbouring Dubai's debt crisis in the first trading day on the Riyadh market in nearly two weeks. -/AFP/Getty Images

Saudi men chat outside the Saudi Stock Exchange or Tadawul in Riyadh on Dec. 5, 2009.
-/AFP/Getty Images

A group of Israeli hackers who call themselves the IDF-Team took down the websites of the Saudi Stock Exchange (Tadawul) and the Abu Dhabi Securities Exchange (ADX) on Tuesday, according to U.S. and Israeli media reports.

According to The Atlantic, the hackers wrote on the online forum pastebin.com that the attack was in retaliation for the "lame" hacking attack on Israeli sites. Hackers had shut down the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange and El Al airlines websites on Wednesday.

"If the lame attacks from Saudi Arabia will continue, we will move to the next level which will disable these sites longer term may come to weeks or even months," they wrote. "You have been warned."

Hackers hit Israeli airline, stock market sites

Both cyber attacks are part of an ongoing battle between Israeli and pro-Palestinian hackers who have been in an online war since early January.

Group-xp, a known Saudi hacking group, released 21,000 credit card accounts online in a period of a few days, claiming on an Israeli sports site that they had access to 400,000 accounts. They claimed the personal information was a "gift to the world for the New Year" created to "hurt the Zionist pocket."

Last week, a pro-Israeli hacker calling himself Hannibal posted information online about hundreds Saudis, Egyptians, Syrians and others in response. Haaretz, an Israeli news organization, reported that 30,000 e-mail addresses and Facebook passwords were exposed.

The hacker claimed to have as many as 30 million e-mail addresses of Arabs. According to Haaretz, Hanibal wrote that if Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declares a cyber war he is ready to publish 10 million bank accounts and 4 million Arab credit card numbers.

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