IRS Worker: Austin Attack "Unfair"

Smoke billows from a seven-story building after a small private plane crashed into the building in Austin, Texas on Thursday Feb. 18, 2010. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett) AP Photo/Jack Plunkett

An IRS worker who was inside her office when a man with a grudge against the agency crashed a small plane into the building called the attack "unfair."

Her comments come a day after A. Joseph Stack III, a software engineer, crashed his plane into IRS offices in Austin, Texas, killing himself and at least one worker, and apparently left behind an irate anti-government manifesto detailing his financial difficulties and tax problems.

"I just thought it was unfair how an angry individual took out his anger on innocent people," Elva Liando, an IRS employee who works on the second floor, told CBS' "The Early Show" Friday.

"I didn't think it was an accident," she said.

Liando said she immediately fled the building upon the plane's impact and said people outside the office seemed in shock.

Fellow IRS employee, Richard Lee, declined to express his feelings about the crash: "I really have no comment about what somebody did because they were mad about the IRS."

The fiery crash wasn't the first time a protester went after an Austin IRS building.

In 1995, Charles Ray Polk plotted to bomb the IRS Austin Service Center. He was released from prison in October of 2009.

A U.S. law official said investigators were looking at an anti-government message on the Web linked to him. The Web site outlines problems with the Internal Revenue Service and says violence "is the only answer."

Facebook Groups Support Domestic Terrorist
Father-in-Law: Pilot Had Hang-Up Over IRS
Austin Plane Attacker's Wife to Speak
Joseph Stack Described as "Easy Going"
Austin Pilot Left Anti-IRS Suicide Note
Man Angry at IRS Crashes Plane into Office
Photos: Austin Crash Pilot Joseph Stack

The tax protest movement has a long history in the U.S. and was a strong component of anti-government sentiments that surged during the 1990s.

That wave culminated in the April 1995 bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City that killed 168 people. Several domestic extremists were later convicted in the plot.
  • CBSNews

Comments

CBSN Live

pop-out
Live Video

Watch CBSN Live

Watch CBS News anytime, anywhere with the new 24/7 digital news network. Stream CBSN live or on demand for FREE on your TV, computer, tablet, or smartphone.