Infant delivered after fatal N.Y. crash in serious condition

Nachman and Raizy Glauber died in a car crash in New York City, but their baby boy was delivered alive. WCBS

Updated 2 a.m. EST March 4, 2013

NEW YORK   New York City police are still looking for the hit-and-run driver and a passenger of a BMW that witnesses say slammed into a car carrying a young pregnant woman and her husband.

The couple, Nachman and Raizy Glauber, died in the crash but their baby boy was delivered alive. He was listed in serious condition at Manhattan's Bellevue Hospital, reports CBS New York station WCBS-TV.

Authorities say the woman was feeling ill and was headed to the hospital with her husband early Sunday when the car they were riding in was hit at an intersection in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn. WCBS reports they had rented a livery car to drive them.

"She was premature; couldn't feel the baby," Raizy Glauber's aunt, Ruchel Bochnel, told the station. "They wanted to check it out."

Isaac Abraham, a community leader, told WCBS the BMW was speeding.

"The woman was thrown out of the car. The driver was okay, the airbags saved him, minor scratches. On impact, the husband was killed immediately," Abraham said.

fatal, car, crash, brooklyn
A worker clears debris from a fatal accident that claimed the lives of two expectant parents, Sunday, March 3, 2013, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. A driver struck the car the couple were riding in early Sunday morning, killing both parents while their baby, who was born prematurely, survived and wasin serious condition.
AP Photo/John Minchillo

The driver of the livery cab , identified as Pedro Nunez, called 911. He was treated and released from Bellevue Hospital for minor injuries, WCBS 880 reported.

The Glaubers were married about a year ago and had begun a life together in Williamsburg, where Raizy Glauber grew up in a prominent Orthodox Jewish rabbinical family.

Raised north of New York City in Monsey, N.Y., Nachman Glauber was studying at a rabbinical college nearby.

Jewish law calls for burial of the dead as soon as possible, and hours after their deaths, the Glaubers were mourned at a funeral Sunday afternoon.

Afterward, the cars carrying the bodies left and headed to Monsey, N.Y., where another service was planned in Nachman Glauber's hometown.

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