How To Feel Better On Vacation

If you are one of those people who think they just can't take a vacation, you may not realize how much you are harming yourself.

Dr. Mel Borins, the author of "Go Away: Just for the Health of It," visits The Early Show to help explain the health benefits from just taking time off.

Several studies have shown that taking your vacation seriously means also taking your health seriously. Consider these findings:

  • Women who vacation at least twice a year have 50 percent less chance of developing coronary heart disease.

  • Men who take more frequent vacations reduce their risk of dying of heart disease by almost 30 percent.

  • Workplace stress can double an individual's chance of dying from heart disease.

    Borins says there are several ways to maximize your vacation. They are:

  • Plan Ahead: You must dream your vacation in order for it to happen. It helps to plan ahead and put a date, and possibly a place, on your next vacation, even if it is months in advance. This gives your dreams substance and allows you to prepare both mentally and financially for more than just a weekend away.

  • Consider Timeshare: Studies show that timeshare owners take longer and more frequent vacations. When you buy a timeshare, you're making an investment in taking a vacation and are more likely to make use of your vacation time. Also, many owners belong to an exchange company, which allows you to vacation in a different location every year. So, there's always something new to look forward to.

  • Leave the Office at Work: Rather than allowing technology to work for us, we tend to take our cell phones, computers and office work with us on vacation. Not only does this take away from personal leisure time, it also invades the quality time that should be spent with family. By establishing a contact person at work, your will feel more comfortable about being away.

  • Begin a Travel Diary: Vacations can be more than just a way to jump off the merry-go-round of life; many people make important decisions and realizations while away from home. It's always a good idea to write down your feelings in the form of a travel journal, for memories, reflection, or the encouragement to begin planning your next getaway.

  • Avoid Depression on Return: Once home again, people tend to mourn the sense of losing the freedom, the novelty and the dream of a never-ending vacation. Avoid this by immediately developing photos from your vacation, make plans with friends to share your recent vacation experiences, book activities you love doing during that first week back and even begin dreaming about your next vacation. Don't overdo things when you first return, instead schedule more leisure time so the transition back will not be so difficult.
    • Rome Neal

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