Abu Qatada Says British Government Full of Venom Against Islam and Muslims

Radical Islamic cleric Abu Qatada issued a long statement from his prison cell in the top British security prison of Long Martin where he lashed out at the British government for what he said was an unjust treatment and prosecution of Muslims. His statement, which was widely distributed on a number of militant Islamist Internet forums and chatrooms, may have come as a reaction to the decision to back Abu Qatada's deportation to Jordan.

Abu Qatada said that his years in prison were not such a bad experience as they allowed him to memorize the Qur'an in full, write a few books and lose a bit of weight. But he continued to claim that they also allowed him to expose the reality of the British government who according to him holds a great deal of enmity towards Islam and Muslims. He said Muslim youths in Britain, especially those who come from Pakistan and India , now despise Britain and look at it as their enemy.

Abu Qatada, who was said to be Bin Laden's ambassador in Europe, also spoke about being in jail for three years without trial, and compared the prison of Belmarch to Guantanamo.

Amongst the people he met in jail, Abu Qatada mentions Khaled al Fawaz, Adel al Masri, Babar Ahmad, Haroun Aswat, and Talha Ihsan, who are all facing extradition to the U.S. He also talked about his meeting with Mohammed Asha, the Jordanian doctor who was arrested in connection with the Glasgow airport attack in 2007, and Bilal Abdullah, the Iraqi doctor who was in the Jeep Cherokee that was rammed into the airport's terminal and set ablaze.

"Dr. Bilal Abdullah is a true man of Islam from all points of views; for he is knowledgeable, proficient, and resolute," Abu Qatada said, "I was humbled when I heard him say to me: "I was very influenced by your taped lectures.'

"Abu Qatada briefly mentioned that the non-Muslim inmates converted to Islam simply by listening to the stories about jihad and martyrdom. "I wish I could tell you more details about those youths who forever lived in the darkness, and when jihad came up they became believers, praying all night, memorizing the Quran and learning Arabic."

And at the end of the statement, Abu Qatada made a discrete appeal for the militants to save him by saying that freeing the prisoners was an "obligation and a responsibility" for Muslims.

Abu Qatada briefly mentioned that the non-Muslim inmates converted to Islam simply by listening to the stories about jihad and martyrdom. "I wish I could tell you more details about those youths who forever lived in the darkness, and when jihad came up they became believers, praying all night, memorizing the Quran and learning Arabic."

And at the end of the statement, Abu Qatada made a discrete appeal for the militants to save him by saying that freeing the prisoners was an "obligation and a responsibility" for Muslims.

Abu Qatada was first arrested in 2005 under immigration rules, as the British government seeks to deport him to Jordan. He was released on bail but was returned to prison following reports that he was attempting to flee Britain. His statement coincides with a ruling by the European Court of Human Rights awarding him £2,500 in compensation. Judges ruled that his detention without trial in the U.K. under anti-terrorism laws constitutes a breach to his human rights.