Boeing 787 Dreamliner's bumpy ride

  • A Qatar Airways Boeing 787 Dreamliner climbs during the Farnborough International Airshow in Hampshire, England. Adrian Dennis/AFP/GettyImages
    Boeing's 787 Dreamliner climbs during the Farnborough International Airshow in Hampshire, England.

    (MoneyWatch) Despite Boeing and the Federal Aviation Administration on Friday announcing a plan to jointly review the 787 Dreamliner's critical systems, U.S. federal regulators continue to express confidence in the aircraft.

    Industry experts say it is common for new aircraft models to roll off the assembly line with some glitches. The 787, the world's first major airliner made primarily of carbon composites, is also widely acknowledged to be state of the art. Among other attributes, the jet's light weight lets it conserve fuel and counter turbulence more efficiently than a standard liner.

    CBS News aviation and safety expert Captain Chesley "Sully" Sullenberger said that this week's series of technical problems for the Dreamliner -- an electrical fire and a fuel leak in Boston, along with an oil leak in Japan -- amount to normal "growing pains" for new aircraft.

    "If you look at the history of aviation, decades ago new airplanes had many more issues and they often led to fatal results," said Sullenberger. "Now we catch these problems much earlier."

    Following is a brief tour through the Dreamliner's missteps.

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