Hunters bearing spears, amulets offer to help search for schoolgirls

They may not be cutting-edge modern warriors, but a group of Nigerian hunters say they may be able to do what the government can't - find and rescue the more than 200 schoolgirls kidnapped by Islamic militants over a month ago.

Extremist group Boko Haram is thought to be holding some of the girls in the sprawling Sambisa forest - not familiar territory to Nigeria's military.

But these men know it well.

Armed with everything from homemade guns to spears and knives, hundreds of them have flocked to Borno state from across northern Nigeria.

Eager to show off the protective power of their magic amulets and herbs, these hunters said Boko Haram's bullets can't do them any harm.

They want to head into the forest and hunt down the Boko Haram fighters, but they're waiting for a green light from Nigeria's military.

Nigeria's leaders have taken a lot of flak for starting the search too late and moving too slowly.

Now, they're getting help from U.S. drones, which will help scan the vast forest for signs of life.

Whether the U.S. military's most advanced hardware or these men - using centuries-old tracking techniques - can actually find the girls is the first challenge.

Then someone, be it soldier or hunter, will have to fight the militants to rescue them.

A vigilante group of traditional hunters poses for a picture at its camp in Maiduguri, Nigeria, May 21, 2014.
A vigilante group of traditional hunters poses for a picture at its camp in Maiduguri, Nigeria, May 21, 2014. About 100 traditional hunters from villages in Borno state have gathered in a camp in Maiduguri and volunteered to hunt for Boko Haram for the local government. The local government gives them two meals per day, they say.
Reuters/Joe Penney

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