Amy Poehler, Lena Dunham among stars putting out memoirs this fall

Amy Poehler and filmmaker Lena Dunham attend the TIME 100 Gala on April 23, 2013, in New York. Larry Busacca, Getty Images for TIME

As summer winds down, many stars are getting to set release memoirs in their own style.

Neil Patrick Harris, for instance, decided that his early 40s was too young for a "life" story, even for a Tony-and Emmy-winning actor. So he has completed "Neil Patrick Harris: Choose Your Own Autobiography," in which Harris steps back into the second person to allow you to imagine yourself onstage, on television, or, in November 2006, on edge as you prepare to tell the world you're gay.

"I couldn't wrap my mind around a structure that made sense to me -- to pass on words of wisdom or to write some salacious tell-all. My life hasn't been like that," Harris said during a recent interview with the Associated Press.

"So I came upon this conceit of 'choose your own adventure,' to allow readers to choose which autobiography they were interested in. You can have poignancy; you can have funny remembrances, or whatever path you want to follow."

"Girls" star Lena Dunham has written "Not That Kind of Girl: A Young Woman Tells You What She's 'Learned,'" a non-advice advice book in which she hopes that readers will know when and when not to emulate "a girl with a keen interest in having it all."

Amy Poehler's "Yes Please" promises a "big juicy stew of personal stories, funny bits on sex and love and friendship and parenthood and real life advice."

Keith Richards, having taken care of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll in his million-selling "Life," now turns sentimental with the picture book "Gus and Me," a tribute to his grandfather, musician Gus Dupree. Neil Young honors a favorite hobby in "Special Deluxe": cars. "Jimmy Page" is a "photographic autobiography" by the Led Zeppelin guitarist. "Jerry Lee Lewis: His Own Story" is not entirely in his own words, alternating between first-person memories and third-person accounts by the Pulitzer Prize-winning author-journalist Rick Bragg.

Former President George W. Bush already has written a memoir, "Decision Points," so for his new book (currently untitled) he tells the story of his 90-year-old father, George H.W. Bush.

"George H.W. Bush is a great servant, statesman, and father," George W. Bush said in a statement from Crown Publishers.

"I loved writing the story of his life, and I hope others enjoy reading it."

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