A military solution appears unlikely in Libya

In the battle for Libya, the country's deputy foreign minister traveled to Greece today, bearing a message from Muammar Qaddafi. No details yet as to what it said.

Meanwhile, back in Libya, the cycle of rebel advances followed by hasty retreats continues, with Misrata in the west and Brega in the east being the two top battlegrounds.

CBS News correspondent Mandy Clark reports that the only rebel-held city in Western Libya is still under siege by Gaddafi forces. Doctors in Misrata say over a 150 people were killed there in the past week and aid is badly needed.

Some help is reaching the city. A Turkish ferry evacuated 250 wounded. It arrived in the rebel stronghold of Benghanzi today to pick up more injured from the Eastern front before heading to Turkey.

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Those wounded are coming from the battlefield of Brega. The oil town remains contested after 5 days of intense fighting. Even with more powerful weapons and better military leadership on the frontline, rebels are struggling to gain any ground.

They are now facing another problem - Qaddafi's forces have changed tactics, moving around in armed pick-up trucks to better blend with rebel fighters.

That makes allied airstrikes difficult; one raid over the weekend accidentaly hit rebel forces killing 13.

The situation makes it seem like a military solution to the conflict is increasingly unlikely, as fighting seems to have reached a stalemate. Now the hope among many here is for more defections from Qaddafi's inner circle to cause the regime to collapse.

  • Mandy Clark

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