Report: Trump is considering rolling back Obama's new policies with Cuba

Cuban President Raul Castro (R) and President Barack Obama prepare for joint press conference at the Revolution Palace in Havana on March 21, 2016.

Cuba's Communist President Raul Castro on Monday stood next to Barack Obama and hailed his opposition to a long-standing economic "blockade," but said it would need to end before ties are fully normalized.

Getty

President Trump is considering rolling back major components of the new U.S. policy President Obama implemented with Cuba, according to The New York Times.

Some of the changes could include reimposing limits the U.S. previously placed on travel to Cuba as well as on commerce, the report said, though it adds that there are internal disagreements about how far to go in reversing the policy so no final decisions have been made yet.

The president could announce the policy changes as early as next month in Miami, the report said. Mr. Trump is mulling proposals introduced by members of Congress that would block transactions between U.S. companies and companies that have ties to the Cuban military. He is also considering, the report said, tightening restrictions on Americans traveling to Cuba.

Ahead of Obama's historic trip to Cuba last year, his administration loosened restrictions on Americans' ability to travel to the country, on business transactions between the two countries and on Americans' ability to purchase Cuban merchandise. Under the new policy, individuals have been allowed to travel to Cuba under "people-to-people" educational trips. Before those policies took effect, only groups of Americans were permitted to visit the country.

These changes came more than a year after Obama's historic announcement in December 2014 to normalize relations with the communist nation. He then became the first sitting U.S. president to visit Cuba in 88 years since Calvin Coolidge in 1928.

Despite the ease in travel, CBS News' Kris Van Cleave reports that Americans are visiting Cuba, but not in the numbers expected.

  • Rebecca Shabad

    Rebecca Shabad is a video reporter for CBS News Digital.