Paul Ryan says he’s not worrying about 2016 yet

House Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan says he's waiting until the end of the current session of Congress to make a decision on the 2016 presidential election.  (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) Chip Somodevilla, Getty Images

For the Republican Party’s 2012 vice presidential nominee, any trip to an early primary state is bound to raise questions about his plans for 2016.

But during a trip to New Hampshire Tuesday, Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., said he will “worry about those things later on” after the current congressional session, according to WMUR.  For now, he’s focused on his work as chairman of the House Budget Committee, which included helping to craft a two-year budget deal after the government shutdown.

Ryan was in New Hampshire attend a fundraiser for former Rep. Frank Guinta, who lost his seat to Democrat Carol Shea-Porter in the 2012 election. When speaking with reporters after the event, he chalked the GOP’s internal divides over strategy lately to “creative tension” and credited the tea party for pushing the party back toward fiscal conservatism.

“Before 2010, I think our party lost its moorings, so I think they’ve done a lot to get us whipped into shape as a true fiscal conservative party,” he said,according to the Concord Monitor. “There’s creative tension in our party – that’s a good thing. You know why? Because we’re debating ideas.”

Like Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., who also appeared in New Hampshire to speak this week, Ryan was strongly critical of President Obama for executive overreach.

"This administration is becoming increasingly lawless by the day," Ryan said, according to the New Hampshire Union Leader. "They are abusing their authority and rewriting laws that they don't have any authority to do so.

  • Rebecca Kaplan

    Rebecca Kaplan is a political reporter for CBSNews.com.

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