Part II: Murder In The Hamptons

Who Killed Millionaire Ted Ammon?

Pelosi and Generosa remained the focus of scrutiny and suspicion and soon they gave everyone even more to talk about. The couple got married in January 2002, just three months after Ammon was murdered.

Then, Generosa moved with her two kids to Danny's hometown, Center Moriches. It was a nice town, but hardly a millionaire's playground.

"Generosa moved to CM for the one reason that she wanted her kids to have a family," says Pelosi. "She wanted me to be around my kids. They live four minutes from here."

Joanne Matheson, Generosa's full-time housekeeper, says her boss was happy with her new life: "As long as she was with Danny, she didn't care. If she was in East Hampton or over there, it didn't matter to her. She was happy."

But just months after they were married, Generosa, 46, learned she was dying from breast cancer. Matheson says the couple spent the next year trying to enjoy most of the time they had left.

Meanwhile, Generosa and Pelosi were emerging as the prime suspects in Ammon's murder and their marriage started falling apart under pressure from the investigation and Generosa's illness.

In July 2003, after nearly two years of marriage, Generosa left Pelosi and moved with her two children back to the East Hampton mansion, where she would spend the last weeks of her life.

But when Generosa died, Danny was on his own, as the lone suspect. "I was freaking out big time," says Pelosi. "Because that's when I realized this is for real."

It made perfect sense to Danny Pelosi at the time to go to the Stanhope Hotel for a farewell drink, with his wife's ashes.

"She told me to take her remains, to go to the bar and sit in the booth that we sat in every night," says Pelosi.

Photographer Robert Kalfus says he found Pelosi sitting in a booth, drinking a beer: "He had a lit cigarette lit for her."

When the New York Post ran the picture the next day, Pelosi started to have some regrets. "Was I embarrassed by that picture they showed? Yes, absolutely."

But Pelosi would soon have a lot more than his image to worry about. He had become the lead suspect in Ammon's murder. In March 2004, after nearly a three-year investigation, Pelosi was arrested and charged with murder.

"We had some pretty powerful circumstantial evidence," says Albertson. "But we did not have the smoking gun. And by no means was this a slam dunk."

"He may not speak the King's English. And he doesn't have a PhD. And in fact, he's a high school dropout. But he's not a killer," says Pelosi's lawyer, Gerald Shargel.

There was no physical evidence linking him to the murder -- no forensics, no witnesses. And Shargel insists that Pelosi, who was only Generosa's boyfriend at the time of the murder, had no motive, because he had no right to Ammon's wealth.

"I will tell you that there was absolutely no motive here," says Shargel. "There was no financial motive, and there was no other motive of any kind."

In fact, according to Generosa's attorney, Ed Meyer, Pelosi got along with Ammon: "He liked Ted Ammon."

But everyone knew that Generosa hated Ammon. In fact, she hated him so much that she didn't want his family caring for her twins after her death.

Generosa was raised an orphan, and had no family of her own. But as she entered the final chapter of her life, Generosa had to pick a guardian for her children. She thought Pelosi was unsuitable, so that left only one person -- 57-year-old British nanny, Kay Mayne.

Pelosi says the Ammon children did not like Mayne. He says he spoke to Generosa about how the kids felt about their nanny. He had a habit of recording his private conversations, he says, to protect him legally.

Generosa's full-time housekeeper, Joanne Matheson, says, "Kay made her feel that she was the only one that could really possibly take care of these children. That she would raise them the way Generosa wanted them to be raised."

When Generosa died of breast cancer in August 2003, she took the answers to many questions with her to the grave.

Part III: Who Killed Ted Ammon?


  • Rebecca Leung

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