Pakistan: U.S. drone kills 10 alleged militants day after conviction of doc who aided bin Laden hunt

GENERIC pakistan missile drone strike CBS/AP

Updated at 3:09 a.m. ET

(CBS/AP) PESHAWAR, Pakistan - Pakistani intelligence officials said a suspected U.S. drone fired two missiles that killed 10 alleged militants in northwest Pakistan near the Afghan border.

The two officials say Thursday's attack took place in a militant hideout in Khassokhel village near Mir Ali in the North Waziristan tribal area. It was the second such attack in 24 hours in the region.

The officials say most of those killed were Uzbek insurgents. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to talk to the media.

Drone strikes have become an increasingly contentious issue between the U.S. and Pakistan. Pakistan's Parliament recently demanded the U.S. end all drone strikes on its territory. The U.S. has shown no intention of stopping the covert CIA program.

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The latest strike came a day after a doctor who helped the CIA hunt down Osama bin Laden was convicted of conspiring against the state and sentenced to 33 years in prison, adding new strains to the already deeply troubled relationship between the U.S. and Pakistan.

U.S. officials had urged Pakistan to release the doctor, who ran a vaccination program for the CIA to collect DNA and verify the al Qaeda leader's presence at the compound in the town of Abbottabad where U.S. commandos killed him in May 2011 in a unilateral raid.

The lengthy sentence given to Dr. Shakil Afridi on Wednesday will be taken as another sign of Pakistan's defiance of American wishes. It could give more fuel to critics in the United States that Pakistan — which has yet to arrest anyone for helping shelter bin Laden — should no longer be treated as an ally.

U.S. Defense Secretary Leon Panetta, who as CIA director oversaw the U.S. raid on bin Laden, said in an interview broadcast on CBS' "60 Minutes" in January that Afridi was "very helpful" with the operation.

"60 Minutes" | The defense secretary: Leon Panetta
Video: Watch the full "60 Minutes" story
Video: Panetta on Afridi

"For them to take this kind of action against somebody who was helping to go after terrorism, I just think is a real mistake on their part," he said.

(At left, watch a "CBS Evening News" report on Afridi)

The verdict came days after a NATO summit in Chicago that was overshadowed by tensions between the two countries that are threatening American hopes of an orderly end to the war in Afghanistan and withdrawal of its combat troops by 2014.

Islamabad was invited in expectation it would reopen supply lines for NATO and U.S. troops to Afghanistan it has blocked for nearly six months to protest U.S. airstrikes that killed 24 Pakistani troops on the Afghan border. But it did not reopen the routes, and instead repeated demands for an apology from Washington for the airstrikes.

Pakistan's treatment of Afridi since his arrest following the bin Laden raid has in many ways symbolized the gulf between Washington and Islamabad.

In the United States and other Western nations, Afridi was viewed as a hero who had helped eliminate the world's most-wanted man. But Pakistan army and spy chiefs were outraged by the raid, which led to international suspicion that they had been harboring the al Qaeda chief. In their eyes, Afridi was a traitor who had collaborated with a foreign spy agency in an illegal operation on its soil.

Afridi, in his 50s, was detained sometime after the raid, but the start of his trial was never publicized.

He was tried under the Frontier Crimes Regulations, or FCR — the set of laws that govern Pakistan's semiautonomous tribal region. Human rights organizations have criticized the FCR for not providing suspects the right to legal representation, to present material evidence, or to cross-examine witnesses. Verdicts are handled by a government official in consultation with a council of elders.

Afridi was tried in the Khyber tribal region, where he was raised. In addition to the prison term, he was ordered to pay a fine of about $3,500 and is subject to an additional 3½ years in prison if he does not, according to Nasir Khan, a government official in Khyber.

Afridi can appeal the verdict within two months, said Iqbal Khan, another Khyber government official.

An official with Pakistan's main Inter-Services Intelligence agency said the decision was in Pakistan's "national interest," and he dismissed earlier appeals by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and other American officials that Afridi should be released. The official did not give his name because the ISI doesn't allow its operatives to be identified in the media.

Asked in Washington to comment, Pentagon press secretary George Little declined to talk about the specific case, but added: "Anyone who supported the United States in finding Osama bin Laden was not working against Pakistan. They were working against al Qaeda."

Afridi was working for local health authorities in northwest Pakistan when he began working for the CIA. Nurses working for him reportedly knocked on the door of the compound in Abbottabad, but were not successful in obtaining a sample from the house to confirm bin Laden was living there.

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