Michael Jackson Lives on, a Year after His Death

michael jackson in documentary about him called "This Is It" CBS

A year ago today, Michael Jackson died, stunning the world.

The circumstances surrounding his death, at age 50, are still a mystery.

But, as the investigation into his passing continues, his legacy is only growing, observes CBS News Correspondent Bill Whitaker, from Jackson's burial site, a crypt in the Forest Lawn Cemetery in Glendale, Calif.

Fans were gathering there and around the world in tribute Friday morning.

Members of the Jackson family are said to have a quiet remembrance planned today, though the Jackson brothers are expected to arrive at forest lawn later to greet the fans.

It might sound ghoulish, Whitaker admits but, "The end of Michael Jackson's life was the start of something big."

Complete Coverage: Michael Jackson's Life, Death, Legacy

"It's possible it was a better year in death than it would have been in life for Michael Jackson," Entertainment Weekly's Whitney Pastorek says.

Nostalgia and a re-appreciation of the King of Pop's music made The Gloved One the top-selling musical artist of the year, with 31 million albums sold worldwide, earning some $310-million.

On top of that, "This Is It," the movie of the tour he was rehearsing when he died, became the top-grossing concert film of all-time, grossing some $261-million around the world.

Jackson's estate has cleared $250 million, much of it going to pay down the massive debts he left behind and to support his three children, Prince, Paris and Blanket, now in the care of Jackson's mother, Katherine.

"You see them around town all the time," says J. Randy Taraborrelli wrote a bestseller about Jackson and remains in touch with family members. "You see them in their karate uniforms. … They look like they're really healthy. … I know that, in September, they'll be starting private school."

The Jackson family is said to be united in caring for the children, and in their determination to see Dr. Conrad Murray brought to justice. Authorities say he administered the powerful anesthetic propofol to help Jackson sleep, then Jackson died. Murray goes on trial later this year for involuntary manslaughter.

"The question is, was propofol the appropriate thing to administer outside of a hospital setting simply to help him go to sleep?" notes CBS Ness legal analyst Lisa Bloom. Murray faces the loss of his license and three-to-six years behind bars if he's convicted.

Photos: Michael Jackson: A Final Farewell
Photos: Key Players: The Jackson Case
Photos: Tears for Michael Jackson
Photos: Jackson's Children Bid Farewell
Photos: Honoring the White Glove
Photos: Memorial Highlights
Photos: Stars Attend Jackson Memorial
Photos: Jackson's Family Says Goodbye
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