From Fort Bragg to Washington Navy Yard, other military shootings

Aaron Alexis moves through the hallways of Building No.197 at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington carrying a Remington 870 shotgun on Sept. 16, 2013, in this handout frame grab provided by the FBI. FBI via Getty Images

The rampage Wednesday that left four dead at Food Hood in Killeen, Texas, is the latest attack at an American military installation. Here are some earlier ones:


WASHINGTON NAVY YARD on Sept. 16, 2013

An employee at a defense contractor killed 12 people after he used his pass to get into the Washington Navy Yard and sprayed bullets in the hallways and fired from a balcony on workers in an atrium below. The gunman, Aaron Alexis, a 34-year-old former Navy reservist, died after a running battle with police.


QUANTICO, VA., on March 21, 2013

A Marine shot two of his colleagues to death and then killed himself inside the barracks at the Marine Corps base in Quantico. Sgt. Eusebio Lopez was a tactics instructor at a school that tests Marines who want to become officers.


NORTHERN VIRGINIA in the Fall, 2010

A schizophrenic ex-Marine was convicted of shooting at the Pentagon and other military targets. Yonathan Melaku of Alexandria pleaded guilty last year to a series of shootings in 2010, including at the Marine Corps museum in Quantico and military recruiting stations. No one was injured. He was sentenced to 25 years in prison.


FORT HOOD, Texas, Nov. 29 2009

Army Maj. Nidal Hasan opened fire in a deadly rampage more than four years ago, killing 13 unarmed people.

Hasan, a former Army psychiatrist who said he was driven by a hatred of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, was convicted and sentenced to death in August 2013 for the attack, in which he also wounded more than 30.


LITTLE ROCK, ARK., on June 1, 2009

Abdulhakim Mujahid Muhammad opened fire on a military recruiting center killing one Army private, and wounding another. Muhammad, angry about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, was sentenced to life in prison without parole after pleading guilty.


FORT BRAGG, N.C. in October 1995

Army Sgt. William J. Kreutzer, who had a history of psychiatric problems, killed one soldier and wounded 18 others, one of a number of shootings at Fort Bragg. He was sentenced to death in 1996, but the sentence was later changed to life in prison. Hasan, a former Army psychiatrist who said he was driven by a hatred of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, was convicted and sentenced to death in August 2013 for the attack, in which he also wounded more than 30



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