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More water problems in Flint, Michigan

FLINT, Mich. -- The trouble with the water in Flint just doesn't let up.

Residents have been using water filters for the last few months since dangerous lead levels were discovered.

Now, it appears some of those filters haven't been filtering enough.

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver said lead readings at 26 homes in the city were 10 times the federal limit-- too high to be treated by filters distributed by the state.

"It's really important that everyone get their water tested," Weaver said.

According to health officials, water lead levels at 3,900 other sites were considered safe. Despite the concerning levels at some homes, the EPA's Mark Durno urged calm.

"We're confident that these filters work," Durno said.

The problems began when Flint switched its water source from the Great Lakes to the Flint River. For more than a year, lead leached from the pipes because the city failed to add standard anti-corrosion chemicals to the water.

At least 100 children have tested positive for high levels of toxic lead in their blood.

"My hair is falling out. My blood tests are a mess. I was healthy," Flint resident Melissa Mays said. Mays has been outspoken about the tainted water, and said she was horrified by the new lead readings.

"There's no trust. There's no trust in the filters, there's no trust in what the state and community are doing at this point," Mays told CBS News.

Health officials will continue to test and treat the water, but warn it could be months before it is safe to drink.