4 Apps and Sites to Take Your Resume from OK to Outstanding

Last Updated Jul 13, 2011 9:40 AM EDT

There's been some talk in recent years that the resume is dead and social media is more important than your CV. And while I think any savvy job seeker is going to make sure their social media outlets, LinkedIn profile, and personal websites are reflecting them accurately, the resume is still relevant.

For one, employers want to be able to screen you quickly, and there are few better ways to do that than glancing over a one-page document that describes you in an easy-to-read format that is familiar to them. That said, there are some relevant apps out there that let technology take your CV to the next level, by making it shine and making it more accessible to both you and potential employers. Here are a few of the best I've found. If you have others, please share them in the comments section.

1. VisualCV This was recommended to me by Ari Herzog of Ari Herzog & Associates. The free site takes a traditional resume and makes it web-savvy, more colorful, and less static. You can add web links, video, charts of your work, and other clickable data. I think of it as a multi-media combination of a resume and personal website.

2. Innovate CV
This cloud-based app tracks your resume, letting you see who has opened it and how long they took to read it. The app also allows you to upload media, but the template is more subdued and simple than VisualCV, which might appeal to job seekers in more conservative industries (note: if you are concerned about any of these apps being too newfangled for your own field, a paper resume is still a sure bet).

3. 1-Page Proposal While not a straight resume app, this website can help you put together a job proposal -- great if you're applying for a freelance opportunity or internship. If you've never put together a project proposal, this single page template app maybe be a great place to start.

4. Resume App on Itunes
For $2.99, your iPhone can produce a PDF of a basic resume (work experience, education, phone/address/etc.). After you add your photo, you can email your new resume directly to a potential employer. While I don't recommend this as your primary resume builder (it's hard to proofread on a phone), it's a great app if you're on the go and need to quickly apply for a position.

What's your favorite resume app? Please share in the comments below.
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    Amy Levin-Epstein is a freelance writer who has been published in dozens of magazines (including Glamour, Self and Redbook), websites (including AOLHealth.com, Babble.com and Details.com) and newspapers (including The New York Post and the Boston Globe). To read more of her writing, visit AmyLevinEpstein.com.

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