U.S. airmen slaying suspect a radical Muslim

Police officers errect a fence around a bus after a gunman fired shots at U.S. soldiers on the bus outside Frankfurt airport, Germany, Wednesday, March 2, 2011 killing two people and wounding two before being taken into custody. The attack Wednesday afternoon came as the bus sat outside Terminal 2 at the airport. The two killed were the bus driver and a passenger, and that one person suffered serious wounds and one light injuries. Mario Vedder,AP Photo/dapd

Police officers errect a fence around a bus after a gunman fired shots at U.S. soldiers on the bus outside Frankfurt airport
Police officers errect a fence around a bus after a gunman fired shots at U.S. soldiers on the bus outside Frankfurt airport, Germany, Wednesday, March 2, 2011 killing two people and wounding two before being taken into custody.
Mario Vedder,AP Photo/dapd
The evidence suggests the gunman accused in the slaying of two U.S. airmen in Germany, Arid Uka, is a radical Muslim who deliberately targeted US servicemen.

However, sources say searches of Uka's computer, phone records, and home have turned up no evidence so far connecting him to any terror group or any broader terror plot.

Uka has confessed, telling German investigators he acted alone. Authorities have found nothing to refute that. Prior to the shooting, Uka was totally under the radar. Sources say he had no police record and his name was not on any US terror watch list.

Investigators believe that Uka, a 21-year-old Kosovo national, became radicalized in recent months. He was a prolific poster on Facebook, visited multiple Jihadist chat rooms and apparently interacted with other Islamic radicals. However, investigators say they have not found any indications that Uka spoke with or took directions from any terrorists.

Airport shooter said to admit targeting U.S. GIs

The motive appears to be revenge for US involvement in wars in Muslim countries. Sources say during the shooting Uka proclaimed "Allahu Akbar," or "God is Great" in Arabic. When he was tackled by police he offered this explanation for the shooting of the airmen, saying simply: "They're at war with us."

Sources say Uka used a nine millimeter semi-automatic handgun in the attacks. He fired nine bullets and only stopped firing when he ran out of ammunition.

Meanwhile, the Air Force identified the victims of the shooting.

Killed were:

Senior Airman Nicholas J. Alden , 25, of Williamston, S.C., assigned to the 48th Security Forces Squadron, RAF Lakenheath, United Kingdom.

Airman First Class Zachary R. Cuddeback, 21, of Stanardsville, Va., assigned to the 86th Vehicle Readiness Squadron, Ramstein AB, Germany.

  • Bob Orr

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