The Last Face Kids Want To See On Facebook

For longtime users of the Web site Facebook, getting an online request from someone to be your "friend" occurs almost daily.

Janelle Hardin, a senior at Azusa Pacific University, got a Facebook friend request from someone who made her a little uneasy -- even though she's known the person all her life.

Says Janelle, "It was weird when my mom got on because I didn't know she knew how to do stuff like that and also it is weird to see your parents on a Facebook profile."

Janelle decided to accept her mom, but not everyone is so gracious. Online groups like "keep parents off Facebook," and "eek, my mom is on facebook" are places for young adults to vent about the parental invasion.

Some young people say having parents on their Facebook page is like giving them the key to their online diary: once you accept a friend invitation, that person can see everything you're up to unless you set privacy limits. Pictures of parties and gossip are the biggest concern.

What was created as a college social networking site has now become the home to 200 million users, and more than two-thirds of them are out of college.

Like mother of three Rhenda Strub. "I went on Facebook to spy on my kids!" she exclaims with a laugh.

Initially her daughter Emma was appalled.

When she got the friend request, Emma says she thought: "No way, no way!"

Fourteen-year-old Emily Higgins "ignored" her dad Joe's friend request, so the Boston advertising executive decided to push a little harder

"I said 'why aren't you friending me,'" Joe says. "She responded, 'that is creepy dad. That is stalking.'"

So Joe set out making T-shirts and bumper stickers, but so far nothing is working.

Emily insists, "He doesn't need to be my friend on Facebook. We live in the same house."

While Emily might have to share her personal space with her dad, like many kids on Facebook, she isnt ready give up her cyber-space -- just yet.

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