Senator Bond Not Apologizing to WH, Brennan



Missouri Senator Kit Bond, a vocal critic of the administration's handling of the Christmas Day bombing attempt, said on "Washington Unplugged" Thursday that he has no plans to apologize for his call for President Obama's top counterterrorism adviser John Brennan to retire. White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs asked the senator for his apology Wednesday.

"My plans are to continue to push to get this administration to recognize that the world changed on 9/11 2001. We found out then that treating terrorists like common criminals was not a way to keep our country safe," Bond said.

"It appears that [the White House] has forgotten that lesson," he added, "and that leaves us in a very dangerous position."

Bond said that while Brennan's recent op-ed saying that critics of the White House were enabling terrorists was "not particularly helpful," he called for the official's resignation because he was not getting the job done.

The ranking Republican in the Senate Intelligence Committee said it "was absolutely not true" that Senate leaders knew that Abdullmuttallab would be mirandized, as Brennan claimed.

"It makes it kind of hard to trust a guy who is that far wrong and does not do the job well," he hammered.

"My real beef here," Bond added, "is the administration needs to stop treating enemy combatants as common criminals."

Moderator Bob Schieffer asked whether any blame should be put on members of Bond's committee.

"We try to do our job as best we can. We know that the intelligence community does not have the information technology it needs to share it, and we are working on it...the rest of it were individual failures up and down the line."

He admitted that "homeland security has been a real challenge" and suggested that the Department of Homeland Security might have added to the "disparate parts" involved in the Christmas Day bombing attempt.

Would you still vote to set up the department, Schieffer pressed.

"I want to rethink that one pretty carefully," Bond said.

Watch the full interview above.

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