Romney may be closing gap with Santorum in Mich.

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. - Michigan Republicans vote in their presidential primary a week from today.

Favorite son Mitt Romney will have to come from behind to win. Several polls show him trailing Rick Santorum in Michigan, though the race seems to be getting tight again.

It may be risky to say this, but the GOP contest is looking increasingly like a two-man race. Yet, if the race has shown us anything, it's that it can change by the day, or even by the hour.

Santorum, who was barely registering in the polls a few short weeks ago, now not only leads Romney in Michigan, where Romney grew up, but nationally.

Befitting his front-runner status, Santorum spent much of Monday in Ohio and Michigan attacking President Obama.

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"This President's doing everything he can to shut down the manufacturing sector of this economy," Santorum charged, "Both from an environmental, energy, regulatory, tax position. ... He alienates every one of our allies, and he's trying to appease and negotiate with every one of our enemies."

Scrambling to stay competitive, Romney attacked Santorum as a phony.

"One of the people I'm running against, (former Pennsylvania) Senator Santorum, goes to Washington, calls himself a budget hawk," Romney said. "Then, after he's been there awhile, he says he's no longer a budget hawk. Well, I am a budget hawk. I don't want to spend more money than we take in."

The Romney-Santorum battle has left Newt Gingrich on the outside looking in. Monday, in Oklahoma -- a Southern state he's counting on for a much-needed win next month, Gingrich sought to remain relevant by reminding voters they are facing a stark choice.

"Barack Obama is the most dangerous president in modern American history," Gingrich asserted. " ... So, defeating Barack Obama becomes, in fact, a duty of national security. Because the fact is, he is incapable of defending the United States."

The good news for Gingrich is that the super PAC that supports him raised about $11 million last month. The bad news is that it spent almost $10 million. And much of the funding still comes from one source -- casino owner Sheldon Adelson.

To see the Dean Reynolds report, click on the video in the player above.

  • Dean Reynolds

    Dean Reynolds is a CBS News National Correspondent based in Chicago.

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