Roman-Era Statue Unearthed After Storm in Israel

A 1,700-year-old statue is hoisted after it was found on the beach in the costal city of Ashkelon, Tuesday, Dec. 14, 2010. Israel's antiquities authority says a storm that raked over part of an archaeological dig this week has exposed a 1,700-year-old statue. The headless marble statue of a woman was found buried in the sand by a resident walking near the shore in the southern city of Ashkelon. (AP Photo / Tsafrir Abayov) AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov

Israel's antiquities authority says a storm that raked over part of an archaeological dig this week has exposed a 1,700-year-old statue.

The headless marble statue of a woman was found buried in the sand by a resident walking near the shore in the southern city of Ashkelon. The mosaic floor of what is believed to have been a Roman bathhouse was also found.

High waves crashing onto the shore during the storm caused part of the site to collapse.

Archaeologist Yigal Israel said Tuesday the statue and other pieces were discovered thanks to the storm, but that other artifacts may have been washed into the sea.

The Israel Antiquities Authority says the strong winds and torrential rain that pummeled the Mideast this week damaged other archaeological sites along Israel's coast.
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