Roger Clemens: Feds "went around the world" to convict me

Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens pauses as he speaks to the media outside federal court in Washington, Monday, June 18, 2012, after he was acquitted on all charges by a jury that decided that he didn't lie to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs. AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Former Major League Baseball pitcher Roger Clemens pauses as he speaks to the media outside federal court in Washington, June 18, 2012, after he was acquitted on all charges by a jury that decided that he didn't lie to Congress when he denied using performance-enhancing drugs.
AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

(CBS News) Roger Clemens says federal investigators "went around the world" to try to dig up evidence that he lied to Congress about using performance-enhancing drugs.

In his first comments since being acquitted on all charges in his perjury trial, Clemens told CBS station SportsRadio 610 in Houston that he gave the government everything they requested, but they were relentless in their pursuit to convict him.

"We tried to do everything the government asked for. We opened up our arms, our house, everything they wanted," Clemens said. "They went around the world looking for people to tie me to. They came up with one guy who painted himself as my personal trainer."

Roger Clemens acquitted on all charges in perjury trial

Clemens was referring to Brian McNamee, his one-time strength coach and the government's star witness - the only person to testify that he witnessed the pitcher inject PEDs.

The seven-time Cy Young Award winner said he couldn't "fathom" why McNamee turned on him.

"When you open up your house to people you never think that behind the scenes someone is planning or plotting something against you because they are either jealous of you or have an ax to grind," Clemens said of McNamee. "I can't fathom the situation that happened."

While the verdict may not sway the public perception of Clemens, many - including Dodgers manager Don Mattingly - think the trial itself was a waste of time and money.

"What a waste. I was thinking about it after all this time, what a waste of resources," Mattingly said Tuesday before his team began a three-game interleague series with the Athletics. "Then you hear about teachers and stuff who don't have paper and pencils for kids, and it seems like what a waste. What a waste of money. Really, I don't think anybody cares. At this point nobody cares, it's like, `So long."'

  • Stephen Smith

    Stephen Smith is a senior editor for CBSNews.com

Comments

CBSN Live

pop-out
Live Video

Watch CBSN Live

Watch CBS News anytime, anywhere with the new 24/7 digital news network. Stream CBSN live or on demand for FREE on your TV, computer, tablet, or smartphone.