Perry's poll numbers slip in Texas after presidential bid

Republican presidential candidate, Texas Gov. Rick Perry pauses while announcing he is suspending his campaign and endorsing Newt Gingrich, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012, in North Charleston, S.C. AP Photo/David Goldman

Republican presidential candidate, Texas Gov. Rick Perry pauses while announcing he is suspending his campaign and endorsing Newt Gingrich, Thursday, Jan. 19, 2012, in North Charleston, S.C.
AP Photo/David Goldman
An ill-fated bid for the presidency has not only taken a toll on Texas Gov. Rick Perry's own popularity, it's also worsened the outlook for another gubernatorial campaign he may yet pursue, according to a new poll by several Texas newspapers.

Perry's popularity in his home state dropped 10 points in the past year to settle at 40 percent, a full three points below that of President Obama statewide. And 37 percent of people say that they have a less favorable view of Perry after a campaign filled with embarrassing stumbles on the national stage, like the time he famously failed to name a third federal department he would cut during a debate in early November.

In worse news for Perry, more than half of people - 53 percent - say he should not run for another term as governor in 2014 (Texas has no term limits). The Dallas Morning News notes that his support for another gubernatorial bid is especially weak among three key voting blocs: people 50 and older, with incomes over $100,000 and with advanced or professional degrees.

Campaign communications director Ray Sullivan noted to the Morning News that Perry has faced bad poll numbers before - particularly during the 2010 governor's race, when he trailed opponent Kay Bailey Hutchison badly entering the race only to win the primary by a significant margin and then handily beat his Democratic opponent, Bill White.

"Governor Perry remains strongly and conservatively at the helm of Texas state government and may well run for re-election in 2014," he told the paper.

The poll was conducted by Blum & Weprin Associates Inc. of New York. The firm surveyed 806 adults (including 669 registered voters) in Texas Saturday through Tuesday. The sample has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.5 percentage points among adults and plus or minus 3.8 percentage points among registered voters.

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    Rebecca Kaplan covers the 2012 presidential campaign for CBS News and National Journal.

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