MLB Scores An "A" For Racial Diversity

Seattle Mariners manager Don Wakamatsu gives a former player a pat before the baseball game against the Los Angeles Angels on Tuesday, April 14, 2009, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

On the 62nd anniversary of Jackie Robinson breaking baseball's color barrier, the Major Leagues scored an "A" for its racial hiring practices, according to The Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.

Major League Baseball enters the 2009 season with 10 minority managers, matching a 2002 record, and an all-time high five general managers. The league's grade for gender is slightly worse, but still represents an improvement from last year - up from a score of 76 to 81, which is good for a "B+."

The 2009 Racial and Gender Report Card: Major League Baseball
The report also showed that the number of African-American players, in decline for the last 15 years, actually rose to 10.2 percent from a record low of 8.2 percent last season.

According to the report:

  • 39.6 percent of Major League players are people of color - 27 percent Latino, 10.2 percent African-American and 2.4 percent Asian.
  • The percentage of Latino and Asian players declined by 2.1 and 0.4 percentage points, respectively.
  • As of Opening Day, 28 percent of Major League players are foreign born, representing 15 countries and territories.
  • The racial breakdown of MLB's minority managers is: five African-American, four Latino and one Asian-American.
  • In 2008, minorities held 33.4 percent of coaching positions in the league, a increase of 2.4 percentage points from 2007.
  • The Boston Red Sox led the league with with seven women in vice president positions. The San Francisco Giants were second with six. Half of all MLB teams have at least one woman in a vice president position.
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