Jerry Seinfeld, Jason Alexander spotted at "Seinfeld" diner

Jerry Seinfeld attends the opening night of "Beautiful - The Carole King Musical" on Jan. 12, 2014, in New York. Neilson Barnard/Getty Images

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"Seinfeld" stars Jerry Seinfeld and Jason Alexander were spotted outside Tom's Restaurant in New York on Monday, sparking rumors of a potential reunion or collaboration between the two funnymen.

Located on the corner of 112th Street and Broadway, Tom's served as the exterior for the fictional Monk's coffee shop, which Jerry and his friends would often frequent on the hit NBC series. The restaurant also served as the basis for Suzanne Vega's 1987 signature hit, "Tom's Diner."

The former sitcom stars appeared to be doing more than just catching up over lunch at the eatery. Photos have emerged on social media of camera equipment positioned outside the restaurant during the pair's visit, and "Seinfeld" co-creator Larry David was seen leaving the establishment just before the two actors made their exit, further adding to the rumor mill:

The sightings come one week after Seinfeld revealed in a Reddit AMA discussion that he is currently working on a "gigantic project" with David, but kept coy on providing any other details.

David, meanwhile, recently told Showbiz 411 that he's written a play and he's in talks with Seinfeld to work on and possibly star in the production. But that still leaves the question unanswered as to what the stars were doing at Tom's.

Fans on social media have wondered if the trio was working on a commercial for the upcoming Super Bowl XLVIII. The secret taping may have also been for a segment on Seinfeld's online talk show, "Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee."

Others are hoping that the shoot was for some sort of a reunion special, similar to the 2009 "Seinfeld" episode of David's HBO series, "Curb Your Enthusiasm," which brought the main cast and supporting players back together on sets recreated from the original series blueprints.

"Seinfeld" ran from 1989-1998 and is considered by many TV critics to be one of the greatest shows of all time, impacting the American lexicon with phrases like "yadda yadda yadda" and "not that there's anything wrong with that."

Tell us: What do you think the trio was up to at Tom's?

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    Ken Lombardi is an entertainment reporter for CBS News. He has interviewed over 300 celebrities, including Clint Eastwood, Oprah Winfrey and Tom Hanks.

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