Iran edges closer to bomb, immigration edges forward step-by-step

(CBS News) -- Iran is getting "closer and closer to the bomb," Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Sunday on "Face the Nation," calling Iran's quest for nuclear power "the most important, the most urgent matter of all." Netanyahu's assessment made headlines around the globe, from the Jerusalem Post to the Washington Post and also at PoliticoNational ReviewReutersAPThe HillThe Wall Street JournalLA Times and Economic Times.

As to whether Iran has crossed the "red line" outlined by the prime minister at the United Nations last year, Netanyahu said, "They haven't yet reached it, but they're getting closer to it and they have to be stopped."

Netanyahu warned that Iran has 190 kilos out of the 250 kilos of 20 percent enriched uranium required to build a nuclear bomb.

Netanyahu assured Schieffer that Israel isn't afraid to use military action in Iran. "I won't wait until it's too late," he said. The New York TimesJewish Telegraphic Agency and Harretz all picked up on Netanyahu's warning.

The prime minister urged Western leaders not to trust the new Iranian President Hassan Rouhani, calling him "a wolf in sheep's clothing," and asserting that Rouhani's policy is to "smile and build bomb."  The Daily Beast and The Washington Post have more on Netanyahu's thoughts on the Iranian leader and elections.

TIME Magazine: Egypt's New Rule

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., appearing later in the program, echoed the prime minister's sense of urgency, calling a nuclear Iran "absolutely unacceptable."

"Neither the American people or Congress are seeking a war, but if the Iranian leadership should push us to the brink, there will come a point when the United State has to stand up for our best interest and the best interest of our allies in the middle east." Politico and The Washington Post have more on Dubin's warning.

Taking a look at what's happening at home, Durbin commented on the Senate's immigration bill. He said it included excessive funding for border security but "When it comes to border security, for some it's never enough." Bloomberg explains that criticism.

Key House Republicans Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., and Rep. Mike Kelly, R-Penn., also appeared on the program to weigh in on the immigration debate.

Diaz-Balart suggested that House will take its time moving forward the legislation.

"In the House, we're going to do it right. We're going to do it methodically," he said.

"We're not going to have to pass it to see what's in it," Diaz-Balart added, taking a jab at the Affordable Care Act. The Hill has more on our conversation with Rep. Diaz-Balart.

Rep. Mike Kelly agreed with Diaz-Balart, pushing for a step-by-step approach to immigration reform. Though Kelly takes issue with the Senate bill, he wouldn't rule out a pathway to citizenship for the House bill.

"Is there is a path to citizenship? I think there is. But I think our plan is about breaking it into separate pieces," he told host Bob Schieffer.

House Republicans also plan to use this piece-by-piece approach for the Farm bill. The bill, which Congress passed this month, did not include funding for federal food stamps.

Kelly explained that a piece-by-piece approach was necessary given the lack of support for a comprehensive bill. When asked whether the House will act to fund federal food stamp programs down the road, Kelly responded, "absolutely."

"I have never talked to one person who said we do not want to take care of the most vulnerable," he said. Politico and Bloomberg picked up on this bite.

Turning to the late-breaking news of the weekend, NAACP President Ben Jealous and Martin family attorney Daryl Parks appeared on the program to discuss verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. Politico has more on our conversation about Zimmerman and what Trayvon Martin's legacy to civil rights and criminal law might be. During our panel, Peggy Noonan warned that involving the Department of Justice--as the NAACP has called for-- will make the case "more political." Her comment got picked up by the National Review.

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