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Families long for answers one year after MH370 vanishes

BEIJING -- Not a shred of evidence has been discovered in the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370: no debris, no life jackets, no seat cushions, and no trace of the 239 people on board.

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Sarah Bajc, the partner of American passenger Philip Wood
CBS News

"I mean, it's been almost a year and I'm still living my life assuming that he's going to come back, his place is still here," said Sarah Bajc, the partner of American passenger Philip Wood.

This weekend will mark exactly one year since the airliner disappeared en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Bajc says although she realizes the likelihood that anyone is alive is "infinitesimal," the chance still exists.

"Until that goes away I'm not willing to stop fighting to find out what happened," said Bajc.

After ten months of searching Malaysian authorities declared Flight 370 was "an accident," paving the way for families to receive compensation. But Bajc questions the authorities' claim and wants to know how they came to their conclusion.

"Show us the evidence that you have found to justify your declaration of 'accident,'" said Bajc.

Frustrated Chinese relatives also refused to accept the finding.

Four ships using sonar and an unmanned sub continue to search a section of the southern Indian Ocean, about the size of West Virginia. Working 12 hour shifts they've scoured about 40 percent of the target area.

Australia's deputy prime minister recently acknowledged the search cannot go on "forever."

"My biggest fear is that we'll never learn what happened," said Bajc.

People in Beijing are just as mystified that this entire 777 aircraft could simply vanish. The anniversary is a reminder that the Chinese government could not do anything to find the plane either, so when protests pop up, they are quickly quieted.