Gunman's Run-Ins With Campus Police

In this undated photo released by the Virginia State Police, Cho Seung-Hui is shown. Seung-Hui, 23, of South Korea, is identified by police as the gunman suspected in the massacre that left 33 people dead at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., Monday, April 16, 2007, the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history. (AP Photo/Virginia State Police) AP Photo/Virginia State Police

On April 18, 2007, Virgina Tech campus police released details of their involvement with Cho Seung-Hui.


Cho Seung-Hui, the Virginia Tech gunman implicated in the deadliest shooting in modern U.S. history, had been accused of stalking two female students and was taken to a mental health facility in 2005, CBS News has learned.

On Nov. 27, 2005, Cho contacted a female student through phone calls and in person. The student notified the Virginia Tech Police Department but declined to press charges. Officers spoke with Cho concerning the incident, however, and the investigating officer referred Cho to the university disciplinary system, the Office of Judicial Affairs. For more information on Judicial Affairs visit www.judicial.vt.edu.

On Dec. 12, 2005, Cho instant messaged a second female student, who made a complaint to Virginia Tech Police. Later that day police received a call from an acquaintance of Cho's who was concerned that Cho might have been suicidal. Officers again met with Cho and talked with him at length. In both instances there was never any direct threat made.

Out of concern for Cho, officers asked him to speak to a counselor. He went voluntarily to the police department. Based on that interaction with the counselor, a temporary detention order was obtained and Cho was taken to a mental health facility, the Carilion Saint Albans Behavioral Health Center. Also in the fall of 2005, the chair of the English department, Dr. Lucinda Roy, shared her concerns with Virginia Tech Police regarding Cho and his course writing assignments.

"These assignments were for a creative writing course that encouraged students to be imaginative and artistic," said W.R. Flinchum, Virginia Tech Police Chief. "The writings did not express any threatening intentions or allude to any criminal activity, and no criminal violation had taken place. Dr. Roy chose to reach out to this student out of concern for him and his mental wellbeing."

Additionally, court records show that Virginia Tech Police issued Cho a speeding ticket on April 7 for traveling at 44 mph in a 25 mph zone. Cho had a court date set for May 23.
  • Alfonso Serrano

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