Guess what? Obama's a millionaire

President Barack Obama greets the audience after speaking at a Walmart store on May 9, 2014 in Mountain View, California. Stephen Lam, Getty Images

WASHINGTON - In posting President Obama's latest financial disclosure report, the White House asserts he has no conflicts of interest, as reviewed and certified by the independent Office of Government Ethics.

The document provides lists of the president's assets and liabilities, along with any financial transactions he's made and gifts he's received and kept.

The report for 2013, was signed yesterday by Mr. Obama and released Thursday.

It shows his single largest financial asset is a block of U.S. Treasury notes valued at between $1 million and $5 million.

The document also lists Mr. Obama's checking and savings accounts, retirement and investment funds. Three are valued in the range of $100,001 to $250,000. None of the others are higher.

The report also shows Mr. Obama was still receiving some royalties from his books in 2013:

  • "Dreams from My Father" (under $100,000)
  • "Audacity of Hope" (under $50,000)
  • "Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters" (under $201)

The president discloses that he has some other deals committing him to write a noon-fiction book after leaving office. Another deal authorizes publication of a version of "Dreams From My Father" suitable for middle grade or young adult readers.

The financial report shows Mr. Obama's only financial liability is the mortgage on his Chicago home. He pays 5.625 percent on the mortgage valued at between $500,001 and $1 million.

Under the law, Mr. Obama must report any gifts of more than $350 in value that he received and kept. None are reported.

On his separate financial disclosure report, Vice President Biden shows he received a cash award last year of $50,000 which he divided and donated to The Pennsylvania Coalition Against Domestic Violence and Women Against Abuse.

It looks like Biden refinanced the mortgage on his Delaware home last year. He reports paying off a mortgage on which he paid 4.625 percent interest and taking out a new mortgage with a 3.375 percent interest rate. Both the old and new more mortgages are valued at between $500,001 and $1 million.

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    Mark Knoller is a CBS News White House correspondent.

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