crimesider

Families of Aurora massacre victims say they aren't getting the funds raised in their loved ones' names

A woman lights candles at a makeshift memorial for victims of the Century 16 movie theater, where a gunmen attacked moviegoers during a midnight screening of "The Dark Knight Rises," July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colo. Twelve people were killed and 58 wounded. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

A woman lights candles at a makeshift memorial for victims at a movie theater where a gunmen attacked spectators during a midnight screening of "The Dark Knight Rises," July 20, 2012 in Aurora, Colo.
Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

(CBS) A group of family members of the victims of the July 20 movie theater massacre in Aurora, Colo., held a news conference Tuesday to express concern over how the organization raising money on behalf of their loved ones has dispersed the millions it has collected.

Pictures: 12 dead, dozens wounded in shooting at Batman movie

Tom Teves, whose son Alex was killed when James Holmes allegedly opened fire during a midnight screening of the new Batman movie, spoke first, his voice breaking occasionally.

"We want the public to know what has been going on behind the scenes regarding the funds being raised," Teves said. "To date we have seen limited victim assistance due to a vacuum of communication and leadership."

Teves said that Giving First, the organization that "used the names and images of our murdered loved ones" to raise $5 million to assist the victims of the Aurora shooting has done a poor job of working with victims' families to disperse it. According to Teves, instead of giving the funds directly to families of victims, they gave the funds to the Colorado Organization for Victims Assistance, which set up a committee to plan further dispersal.

According to Teves, there are no victims or victims' families represented on that committee.

Teves said the families of the victims want "robust representation" on that committee and are concerned their voices are not being heard.

"Governor Hickenlooper, you came and grieved with our families," said Teves. "You said, 'We will remember.' Are you a man who is true to his words, or are they just words?"

"Evil started this, good has to finish it," he said. "It's time to pick a side. This is not a political race, this is the human race."


  • Julia Dahl

    Julia Dahl writes about crime and justice for CBSNews.com

Comments

Follow Us